Squares

General FreeBASIC programming questions.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 11, 2019 19:48

@BadIdea

That's why it's in the Bible , that there would be "eqarth quakes" in one place after another...

Tesla said he could ring the earth like a bell with his machine.. Maybe it could split the earth in half?
badidea
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Re: Squares

Postby badidea » Jun 11, 2019 19:55

Well, in that case, better not to try it.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 11, 2019 20:05

You calculate , the speed of the waves in water.
That speed should be the same for every other object.

You calculate that speed , traversing the object you want to earth quake.

And that should be the required pulse rate.

In a bowl of water, you drop a pebble into it , at the center , it makes a wave that travels to the outside of the bowl and returns..
When the wave meets at the center , it makes a little cone stick up.

For 2 bowls ; one 4 inches diameter and one 8 inches diameter . The cone at the center for the 8 inch bowl would be half the speed as the 4 inch bowl.

So for a cube of concrete , 1 foot in diameter , the waves would traverse it at the same speed as waves in water.
For a 100 foot building , the pulse rate would be 100 times slower , that for the 1 foot block. (probably like a pulse every 3 or 4 seconds. )
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 11, 2019 22:42

I was close!!!

The speed of waves in water, is similar to gravity speed. , 23 meters a second.

From Google: search for "Speed of waves in water"

Wave Motion
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/watwav.html

Using the wave velocity expression for this wavelength in the deep water limit, the wave speed is calculated to be 23 m/s. Mayo calculates the power of one ...
Richard
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Re: Squares

Postby Richard » Jun 11, 2019 22:45

Albert wrote:The speed of sound varies with altitude..
I think at sea level it's like 360 MPH , Test vehicles at the "Bonneville Salt Flats" hit 360 mph.. They called it Mach 1
At 10,000 feet its 460 MPH , The WWII airplanes "Mustangs" were limited to that 460 MPH..
At 30,000 feet its like 1,700 MPH

That is absolute rubbish.

NOT 360 miles per hour at sea level, but maybe 340 metres per second.

The speed of sound in air is a function of the absolute temperature, not pressure. At high altitudes like 30,000 ft, where jet aircraft cruise, the temperature is stable at about -57°C so the speed of sound is lower there than it is at sea level. Check your facts.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_ ... _acoustics

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse was due to flutter caused by the flow of the wind across the deck structure of the bridge. The bridge deck then swung like a pendulum, which is a structural resonance, quite unrelated to the speed of sound in the material.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 11, 2019 22:59

@Richard

The speed of sound in an object , has no relation to the waves traveling through it..

( The speed of sound in an object , tells you its resonant frequency. )
If you pulse a speaker at that resonant frequency it will start vibrating and break apart..

When you tap water , the wave travels out at a low frequency ( not the speed of sound in water )
You can visibly see the waves traveling.. So its a real low speed.

That speed of waves in water , should be the same speed , as waves in any other substance.
Tapping any object should cause waves , and those waves should be the same speed for every object...

Tapping a gold bar , the waves would be the same frequency as that of tapping a rubber bar of the same dimensions..

Tesla's "Earth Quake Machine" Works on timing the waves , traversing the object , and pulsing as the waves return to go back out to the opposite side.
You tap , it creates a wave, the wave goes out to the other side and then returns, as it's getting ready to go back out to the other side , you pulse it , and it amplifies the wave...
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 11, 2019 23:13

In my above post..

Googling "speed of waves in water"
Returned a site that stated the speed of waves in water , was 23 meters a second..

23 * 100 = 2300 centimeters a second..

So ; for a wine glass , 10 centimeters in diameter , the waves would travel through it , would require 230 pulses a seond..
Since you have to wait for the wave to traverse the object and return , you would pulse it at 115 pulses a second.. To get it wobbling like rubber..

I think that's a little much...
I think the speed of waves in water is actually somewhat lower that that.

The real pulse rate should be just a few fractions of a second..
For a steel rail ( 2 inch , tubular steel ) 3 feet high and 4 feet long , only required a tapping at just under a second each tap...To get it wobbling nearly a foot in each direction.. I was wobbling like rubber..
A real life experience , not philosophy or guessing.. I just got in time with the waves and it started wobbling like rubber.
Last edited by albert on Jun 11, 2019 23:50, edited 2 times in total.
Richard
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Re: Squares

Postby Richard » Jun 11, 2019 23:30

@Albert. You do not seem to be thinking clearly.
Have you changed or reviewed your medication lately?

@dodicat.
Sandy Kidd, as a Scottish inventor, would be more successful if he carried out his experiments on the shores of Loch Ness. Such a fabulous device must be seen to be believed; Alas, it has been extinct for more than 30 years now.
http://www.gyroscopes.org/forum/questions.asp?id=2860
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 0:19

If the speed of waves in water is 23 meters a second..

Then you could destroy a 23 meter diameter building ; by pulsing a woofer every two seconds.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 16:07

9:01 = Tine yo bun
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 16:27

For the "Earth Quake Machine":

Contact waves ; traverse all substances at the same speed...No matter how soft or hard they are.

If you have three rods ; one rubber , one steel , one glass

When you tap them , the waves will traverse them all , at the same speed.

You drop a pebble into a bowl of water , and measure the time it takes for the wave to reach the outside of the bowl.
That speed is the wave propagation speed of waves in all substances.

Then ; you just figure out the dimensions , of the object you want to quake.
And pulse it , at half that wave propagation speed.


Nylon guitar strings vibrate the same as steel guitar strings. , the waves propagate both kinds at the same speed/.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 16:51

I have to ponder guitar strings further...

The waves propagate the strings...

The strings are all the same length.
But different tensions on the different strings , create different frequencies.
So the tension , affects the waves traversing the string.
The more tension , the higher the frequency.

All the strings are different diameters, but you can tune one string to equal another..

In real life objects , there's no tension on the object..Just different states of hardness.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 17:10

You could say that the guitar "E" string is softer than the guitar "A" string...

The tension causes hardness..

So maybe i'm wrong , that propagation waves , travel the same speed in every substance.

Waves might travel faster in concrete , than in rubber?

I just know that:
You tap or pulse a speaker in time with the waves traversing an object , and it will start wobbling like rubber , no matter how hard it is.
That tap speed , is a real low rate.
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 17:24

So if hardness affects wave propagation speed , then :

On a scale of 1 to 1000

You could say that water has a hardness of 1 and diamond has a hardness of 1000..

So: if waves in water , travel as 23 meters a second , then waves in diamond , would travel 23,000 meters a second.

So concrete might be 800 hardness ?? 23 meters a second * 800 ?
albert
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Re: Squares

Postby albert » Jun 12, 2019 17:36

The Mohs scale

Says talc is hardness 1 , and diamond is hardness 1500...

Maybe diamond is 1,000,000 times harder than water?

I couldn't find any data on the wave propagation speed of talc. How much harder is talc than water??

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohs_scal ... l_hardness

So water on the Mohs scale might be like -100 ??

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