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by albert
Dec 08, 2009 17:54
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

@ Richard and BFuller I put the other line in at .7853. the degrees from .7853 to .7071 are half the opposite degrees. as you rotate the square around drawing lines at the radians of the prior angle you are half the degrees from the intersection. The angle of the yellow line is half of the opposite ...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 23:31
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

I don't know how to put pictures on this message board. Bu if you draw the degrees angle and the draw the opposite angle and draw a line accross the square at the height of the length of arc. the intersection of the degree angle and the opposite angle is 1/4 of the degree from the line you drew acro...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 20:16
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Forget it! it doesn't work, the degrees marks are wide around 45 degrees. I tried 90+1/8 and it didn't work so good so i tried 90 + grad/8.75 and it worked a little better but i could only get a magnification of 1. '================================================================ ' approximations me...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 17:57
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

the ratios are 1 to .5 to .25 which gives you an increment of 1.5 when adding the two vectors. the degrees increment by 1, the opposite angle decrements by .5 and the opposite of the opposite decrements by .25 or half the opposite, its always a 1 to .5 ratio. The intersection is always a quater of t...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 3:29
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

I'm starting to remember some things, keep it up! you guys are helping me refresh my memory some. I used to have a book called "Vector Analysis" My dad bought me when i was interested in taking flying lessons, And i adapted some of the formulas from that book to get my lines rotation for my drawing ...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 1:56
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

I found a way to minimize the errors in the sin() and cos() where they make gaps in the line segments of the circle. Check this good looking circle out. (I cheated! I found out that the mag can be used to correct the gaps in the circle. ) '============================================================...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 1:50
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

The .292894 is the opposite of .707106 (sqr.5) 1 = sqr(.5) = .292894....... if you draw a line from radius, ycenter(0) to 1 at 67.5 degrees it intersects the 45 degree line at .292894 from the vertical. 90 - 67.5 is 22.5 and not 23.5 sorry!!! about the screw-up. in a circle the other two angles opps...
by albert
Dec 07, 2009 1:08
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

@Richard The 23.5 is the opposing angle of 45 degrees 180 - 45 = 135 135 / 2 = 67.5 degrees from the horizontal. 90 - 67.5 = 23.5 degrees from the vertical. When you take a degree angle the opposite angle is 180 - degree / 2 as The opposite angle has two macthing degrees. And the three degreees add ...
by albert
Dec 06, 2009 23:49
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Thanks Bemptier!! I'll keep at it until i come up with something! I think that 16 places of sin() and cos() with the normalization will cover it. Although at .5 step the 15 place circle looks better than the 16 place circle. but at 1 step the 16 place circle looks better than the 15 place circle. An...
by albert
Dec 06, 2009 20:54
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Richard the normalization doesn't work too good, I tried the sine and cosine to 10 digits and then tried to normalize them with the; s,c = s,c / sqr( c*c + s*s ) And the degrees are off quite a bit. I was only able to get 10 million on the magnification level. At 18 digits its the full sine and cosi...
by albert
Dec 06, 2009 19:07
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

I tried to get the tan() circle to do 90 degrees and it wouldn't close at exactly pion2/90 so i had to add to it a little. It makes a nice looking circle, better than 100 degrees but there is still a gap on each side of 45 degrees around 35 and 55 or so. '============================================...
by albert
Dec 06, 2009 2:42
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Thanks again, Richard its good to 10 trillion. however the print atan2(s,c)*100/pion2 gives me some 7's in the last column and some 83's in some cases. And if you step pion2 / 1 it goes to -99.999999 degrees. =============================================== Richard is there a way to use the tan() to ...
by albert
Dec 05, 2009 23:02
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Richard your For t = 0 To Pion2 Step Pion2 / 100 ' set the exact phase angle x = 1 y = Tan(t) ' normalize the radius r = Sqr(x*x + y*y) c = x / r s = y / r next t code fails at a mag of one. It draws a 90 degree arc to the left with the error level??????? '===========================================...
by albert
Dec 04, 2009 3:22
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

I remember my old method! Where i'm figuring 200 degrees in a triangle instead of 180,this makes 90 degrees into 100 degrees. The opposite angle is 200-deg/2 or 180-deg/2 if you take 1 deg the opposite angle is 99.5 which gives a cosine of .5 degrees , the opposite of that angle is 99.75 deg which m...
by albert
Dec 01, 2009 16:37
Forum: General
Topic: Circles
Replies: 1988
Views: 154197

Any sugetsions Richard? The goal hasn't changed, I'm still trying to obsolete sine and cosines. Your loopy version is accurat to 14 places my above one is accurat to 15 but it can't do inbetween degrees, the sine,cosine function are good to 100 trillion , thats 16 places. Once we get to 16 places ac...

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